Category: Stanglin Family (page 1 of 16)

OC Homecoming 2019

With two of our daughters at Oklahoma Christian University, we take the opportunity to get back to campus much more often than we ever have before. And we always have a blast. This past weekend was OC’s Homecoming which means the annual Delta Alumni Breakfast at Bob Elliott’s house. I feel really blessed to know as many of the younger Delta guys as I do my own peers. It’s so cool to hang out with Legacy kids like Dillon and Colton, Central kids like Brayden, and my nephew Asa. And it’s so much fun getting caught up with Mike Osburn and Scott Williams and other guys with whom I’ve done jail time. I don’t know what it’s like at the Theta breakfast or other OC social service club alumni get-togethers. But at 10:00, they’re having to run us out. How do you sufficiently cover all the necessary talk about camp outs, knives, political rallies, ACLU lawsuits, pumpkins, parties, cars, float trips, Spring Sings, Homecoming bloats/goats/moats, concerts, apartment furnishings, probations, nicknames, and near-death-experiences in just two hours?

 

 

 

 

Valerie was in charge of the OC Homecoming parade. I’m not sure how that happens but she got it and she owned it! She had to keep up with all the floats, approve all the designs, secure all the convertibles and antique cars, put everything in order, oversee the script, and get it started and finished on time. She killed it! And she looked super cute riding in the blue convertible VW with David in the seat right behind her.

Peace,

Allan

Halloween Throwback

A vintage photo of life in the ’70s at 2512 Terra Alta Circle. This is my sister, Rhonda, and me after Trick ‘r Treating on Halloween night 1972. I had just turned six, Rhonda was four. Notice that Rhonda is wearing a hand-me-down bunny costume I had worn the year before — classic. Notice the Dairy Queen logo on the free gimmee bags — our grandmother worked at the DQ at Prairie Creek Lane and Bruton Road. Notice the elaborate pattern on the curtains and the orange living room (no, this is the den!) chair. Notice the terrible plastic masks, the masks with the tiny little mouth and nose holes that were just big enough to suffocate a small child, the masks that took about 90-seconds to build up on the inside a disgusting warm glaze of sweat and breath. I can feel it now!

Happy Halloween!

Allan

Back to OC

We’re still two weeks away from classes beginning at Oklahoma Christian University, but we moved Valerie and Carley back to Edmond Saturday. Both of our younger daughters have leadership roles with OC’s annual orientation next week, “Earn Your Wings.” So they were going to get there early anyway. But Val needs to be there even earlier to attend training as a new residence director. Well, we’re not making two trips. So, they’re both in.

Valerie is in a different on-campus apartment with just one roommate — one of the perks of being a residence director. And Carley is sharing a dorm suite with a bunch of her buddies.

 

 

 

 

 

At this point, the whole thing has become a foregone routine. We eat dinner at Alfredo’s in Yukon Friday night on the way to my sister Rhonda’s house in Edmond, spend the night with Rhonda and her family, move the girls in at OC Saturday morning, eat lunch at The Garage, go shopping for the girls (trash cans, storage drawers, milk, bread, chips, ice-cream sandwiches), fill up their cars with gas, and be back in Amarillo before dark.

Valerie is a senior Youth Ministry major. She’s graduating in April with a Youth and Family Ministry degree and is in the beginning stages of looking for a full-time youth ministry gig. If you know of a Church of Christ that’s looking for a dynamic, hard-working, self-starting, female youth minister with a heart for young people, get in touch with Val right now. She’s going to be in high demand.

Carley is a sophomore Psychology major looking to complete her bachelor’s degree in under four years and earn her doctor’s degree from OSU or UT or some huge state school in less time than that.

Carrie-Anne is also starting back to school as the Culinary Arts Director at Canyon and Randall High Schools in the Canyon ISD. She’s in a brand new kitchen in a new building and will probably be living/teaching out of boxes for the first few weeks.

As for Whitney and me, we’re trying to squeeze in a couple of more Sod Poodles games before the season ends.

Peace,

Allan

Sod Poodles and Blind Cows

My brother Keith and his family came through Amarillo last night on their way home to Austin from a vacation in Yellowstone and we took them to their first Sod Poodles game at our new downtown ballpark. We had planned to introduce them to all the really great things about Sod Poodles games: free parking on Fillmore Street, Texas Tea, Dickie’s Frito Pie, six-dollar nachos, wondering why Ruckus wears a belt but no pants, cheering the local players by their first names, loving the evening weather in Amarillo, running into more than three-dozen people from church, explaining “HodgeVision,” expecting at least two or three homeruns, singing that awful song during the seventh-inning stretch, and throwing tennis balls at the target in left field.

What we didn’t expect was for my two nephews to be selected to provide the in-between entertainment during the second inning. Almost as soon as we found our seats (not our seats; Dale Cooper’s awesome seats), Paul and Isaac were asked to participate in the on-field Caviness Beef promotion. And before the young lady in the “Sod Squad” jersey could explain the details, they were both signing the waiver forms.

Paul and Isaac had to put on cow costumes that serve to remind the crowd more about Chick-fil-A than Caviness Beef, put on blindfolds, submit to being spun around about seven hundred times, and then find the staffer standing in left field ringing a cow bell. The winner received ten pounds of frozen beef.

They’re brothers. So Keith and Amanda won either way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

After Paul and Isaac both simultaneously and blindly assaulted the lady in left field, the P.A. announcer declared it a tie and we walked out of there at the end of the night with a 7-0 Sod Poodles win and a box of fresh regional ground beef. Only in Amarillo!

Peace,

Allan

Keith, Buddy Holly, and Ruckus

Church historian and theologian John Mark Hicks has published his recent review of my brother Keith’s latest book, The Letter and Spirit of Biblical Interpretation. Hicks presented the review during a 90-minute session at last week’s annual Christian Scholars’ Conference at Lubbock Christian University. In fact, three scholars presented their reviews and then Keith formally responded. I’m not sure how familiar you are with these kinds of things, but biblical scholars and academics frequently come together to exchange really long words and very dry humor.

Being that Lubbock is less than two hours south of Amarillo, Keith and I decided to make it a day. We took in the Buddy Holly museum together that morning and posed for the typical pictures. We enjoyed a great lunch together at Chuy’s — also very typical and expected. And then I was pleased to attend the session that honored Keith’s book in particular and his great work for the Church overall.

(There were just the two of us and no other visitors at the museum to take our pictures.)

Keith’s book explores the shift over the centuries from a “both/and” reading and interpreting of the Scriptures in which the scholar or exegete considers both the literal meaning of words and passages and the spiritual or metaphorical or allegorical meaning to an exclusively critical historical method in which the verses and passages can only mean today what they meant when they were written. Now, that’s an oversimplification — you have to read his book to get all the nuance of that. But Keith appeals to the Rule of Faith, the ancient creeds, as a guideline for biblical interpretation and application and he pushes for the recovery of the “both/and” methods that the Church employed for the first 1,500 years of Church history. It’s a good book. I recommend it. Although universities are using it as a text book, it’s not nearly as technical as his other works. It contains references to classic rock and movies and a very helpful illustration borrowed from The Simpsons. You can read this thing.

Hicks just posted the entire review on his blog here.

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Carley and I took in the Sod Poodles game last night with Greg and Bruce in Dale’s suite seats. And I shamed Carley into taking a picture with the team’s mascot, Ruckus. (There were other people there to help us take the pic.) Come on! How great is that?!

Peace,

Allan

Brother of the Year

For his unequaled acts of kindness and hospitality, I would like to officially nominate Keith Stanglin for Brother of the Year. If there is such a thing, my brother should be considered. Keith surprised me last night by taking me to ZZ Top’s 50th anniversary concert at the Circuit of the Americas amphitheater in Austin.

I’m in the capitol city this week for the annual Sermon Seminar at Austin Graduate School of Theology. As is my custom, I am staying with Keith and his family, enjoying Amanda’s cooking, and getting caught up with my niece and nephews. We typically attempt to do something fun together during this week — usually it’s a Round Rock Express baseball game. And we are doing that this Tuesday night. But last night was completely unexpected and over-the-top cool.

Keith kept telling me we were going to have an outdoor activity Sunday evening, but he wouldn’t tell me what. He told me to wear shorts and a T-shirt, but he wouldn’t tell me what we were doing. So we all piled in the car and started driving. As we got closer to the venue, it became obvious that we were attending something big. Lines and lines of hundreds of vehicles were pouring into the racetrack and I still couldn’t figure out what we were doing.

Even as we pulled into the parking lots I couldn’t guess. Until I stepped out of the car and was approached by a man selling bootleg T-shirts. “$40 inside, $20 right here!” And he shoved the T-shirt in my face.

ZZ Top. 50th Anniversary Show.

Not  some local cover band. Not an art festival. Not disc golf. ZZ Top! It was right there on the shirt!

That’s how I found out.

 

 

 

 

 

So, yeah, last night I got to take in ZZ Top, which is always special. But Cheap Trick and Bad Company were also on the bill! Cheap Trick opened up with an ear-splitting 45-minute set. And then Paul Rodgers took the stage with his bandmates and played Bad Company’s classic arena staples for a little over an hour! I had seen Paul Rodgers at Reunion Arena in Dallas back in 1986 when he was fronting The Firm with Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page. And I had seen Bad Company at Tulsa’s old Brady Theater in 1987 when they had a different lead singer. But I had never seen Bad Company with their original vocalist until last night. And it was awesome. His voice is still so clear, he still sounds so good. And then they closed with Free’s “Alright Now,” which I always forget is a Paul Rodgers song. What an incredible highlight. And then ZZ Top. I don’t know how they get so much out of two guitars and a drum, but they do. It’s at least the fifth and possibly sixth time I’ve seen the little band from Texas live. Their voices are running out of gas — Dusty Hill turned 70 yesterday — and they don’t move around at all on the stage. But, man, can those guys play!

I am really looking forward to this particular Sermon Seminar because of Mark Hamilton, Jim Reynolds, and Harold Shank. As good as they’re going to be this week, they are not the same Tres Hombres.

I go to concerts now and it’s different. The crowds are older. Maybe even old. I noticed during the show that people were passing french fries and sharing funnel cakes — not exactly the way I remember the last time I saw Cheap Trick. But it’s really cool sharing the music and the bands you love with your niece and nephews. And your brother. The Brother of the Year.

Peace,

Allan

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